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Jane Greenhalgh

Jane Greenhalgh is a senior producer and editor on NPR's Science Desk.

She produces the weekly Health segment on NPR's Morning Edition and writes and edits for NPR's health blog, "Shots." Greenhalgh also produces stories on science, health, and global health across NPR's many platforms.

Greenhalgh was part of the team of broadcast, digital, and multimedia journalists who produced the 2015 award-winning series "#15Girls," which examined the struggles teenage girls face throughout the developing world. Greenhalgh's story "Banished to the Shed" was one of NPR's most listened to and viewed stories of 2015.

She has twice won The American Association for the Advancement of Science award: In 2020 for her work on Victoria's Story: Gene editing helps people with sickle cell, and for NPR's 2014 series "The human microbiome: guts and glory." Greenhalgh also won The National Academies of Science Communication award in 2014, and she was part of the digital team which won for the 2009 series Climate Connections. She traveled extensively for this year-long, multi-platform project, examining how climate change is affecting people across the globe. From Timbuktu, where the desert nomads are giving up their way of life, to Peru, where potato farmers are moving their crops higher up the mountain, and to Bangladesh, where scientists are experimenting with drought and flood resistant rice, the stories Greenhalgh produced chronicled the impact of climate change.

Greenhalgh has traveled extensively covering health issues in developing countries, including cholera in Haiti, polio in Indonesia, tuberculosis in Kenya, AIDS in India, malaria in the Gambia, malnutrition in Bolivia, and menstrual health in Nepal.

Life expectancy in the United States declined by a year and a half in 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which says the coronavirus is largely to blame.

COVID-19 contributed to 74% of the decline in life expectancy from 78.8 years in 2019 to 77.3 years in 2020, according to the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics.

The highly contagious delta variant now accounts for more than 51% of COVID-19 cases in the U.S., according to new estimates released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The variant, also known as B.1.617.2, was first detected in India and is spreading quickly across the globe.

And in parts of the U.S., the delta strain accounts for more than 80% of new infections, including some Midwestern states such as Missouri, Kansas and Iowa.

The Delta variant, which was first detected in India, now accounts for more than 6% of all infections in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And this highly transmissible variant may be responsible for more than 18% of cases in some Western U.S. states.

The Food and Drug Administration says it's now OK to store the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at normal refrigerator temperatures for up to a month. This is much longer than was previously allowed under the FDA's emergency authorization and will make storage and distribution of the vaccine easier.

Since the pandemic began, pregnant people have faced a difficult choice: to vaccinate or not to vaccinate.

The risk of severe disease or even death from COVID-19 — while small — is higher during pregnancy. More than 82,000 coronavirus infections among pregnant individuals and 90 maternal deaths from the disease have been reported in the U.S. as of last month.

It's been more than a year since I've seen my mother. Like many families, we live a fair distance apart and the pandemic has put a stop to our visits. I was supposed to visit last April to celebrate her 90th birthday, but instead we shared a toast over the phone and tightly crossed our fingers that by summer things would be better. They weren't.

It's supposed to be the happiest time of the year, but this year it doesn't really feel like it. With many of us hunkered down at home, some having lost jobs, others having lost friends and family members to COVID-19 or other illnesses, it's tempting to give this holiday season a miss.

But it's important to find joy and meaning in the midst of this dark winter — and carrying on with favorite holiday traditions can help. NPR checked in with medical researchers to figure out how risky our favorite customs are, and highlight ways we can all celebrate more safely.

It has become the battle cry of public health officials around the world: "Wear a mask to slow the spread." Friday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new evidence supporting this advice.

Researchers analyzed coronavirus infection rates in Kansas following a statewide mask mandate. They found that counties that chose to enforce the mandate saw their cases decrease. Counties that chose to opt out saw their cases continue to rise.

The vast majority of children dying from COVID-19 are Hispanic, Black or Native American, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Researchers analyzed the number of coronavirus cases and deaths among people under the age of 21 that were reported to the CDC between Feb. 12 and July 31 of this year. They found more than 390,000 cases and 121 deaths.

As schools across the country grapple with bringing kids back into the classroom, parents — and teachers — are worried about safety. We asked pediatricians, infectious disease specialists and education experts for help evaluating school district plans.

What we learned: There's no such thing as zero risk, but certain practices can lower the risk of an outbreak at school and keep kids, teachers and families safer.

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