WXXI AM News

Hélène Biandudi Hofer

Need to Know Host

Hélène Biandudi Hofer is host and producer of WXXI TV's Need to Know, an award-winning, half-hour weekly news and public affairs program. Hélène joined the station in September 2010 as the host of All Things Considered.

Before moving to Rochester, Hélène worked at the CBS Primetime show 48 Hours Mystery in New York City. While at CBS she contributed to several documentary specials for the network including the tragedy at Virginia Tech, the tribute to news icon Walter Cronkite, the inauguration of Barack Obama and the CBS/VOGUE Fashion’s Night Out program.

Hélène is a graduate of New York University’s Broadcast Journalism program. After graduation, she returned to her hometown, Columbus, Ohio, where she worked as an associate producer for WBNS-TV.

Ways to Connect

Providing dignity to lives lost to homelessness while helping those in need get into the workplace. That’s the driving force of a local program called Memorials Co-op Ink – an effort of Saint Joseph’s House of Hospitality. The group creates wooden burial caskets and urns for indigent community members after death. Members of the group join this edition of Need to Know to explain the impact of this project not just in honoring the dead, but also in providing more life for the living.

When Daphne Pariser was 10-years-old, she traveled to Kenya with her father. What she saw on this trip would change her life forever. It was on a bus ride through Nairobi when she came face-to-face with a young boy living in extreme poverty. It was a moment that launched a life purpose for a 10-year-old girl. Fast-forward and the now University of Rochester PhD student is the Founder and CEO of Humans for Education. The nonprofit works to empower children and revolutionize global communities by working with locals to help them develop sustainable long-term solutions to poverty.

It was a bus ride through Nairobi, Kenya, that inspired Daphne Pariser to be the change she wanted to see in the world. More than a decade later, you'll learn how that bus ride led to an effort to change young lives in lands far away from Rochester.

Also on the show, you'll meet men on a mission to bring dignity to lives lost to homelessness.

A new exhibit is giving the public a taste of Queen Victoria’s style circa 1850. The exhibit also shares her influence on fashion and the impact of Queen Victoria’s style on clothing designs and creations in America. The Genesee Country Village and Museum is home to newly opened costume exhibit Victoria’s Closet: Fashions of the 1850s. On this edition of Need to Know, we learn about the relevance of fashions in the 1850s on our society today.

The Reverend Myra Brown made headlines when she became one of the first African American women in the US to be ordained as a priest. That was back in 2017. Today, after nearly 30 years in ministry, she continues to champion racial justice work throughout Rochester. Armed with a congregation of 1,5000 people, the senior pastor of Spiritus Christi church is on a mission to help bring racial reconciliation and justice to the community.

 

You'll meet a pastor, an activist, and a change maker who has some ideas on how to create a healed and whole Rochester. A sit-down with the Rev. Myra Brown of Spiritus Christi Church kicks off the program.

Then, we turn to fashion and how the styles of the 1850s are influencing us today.

Meet a pastor, an activist, and a change maker. We sit down with the Reverend Myra Brown of Spiritus Christi Church who shares her views on the path ahead to create a healed and whole Rochester.

Also on the show, the force of 1850s fashion and how it’s still influencing our society today.

It’s not easy for those impacted by substance abuse and the criminal justice system to find a new footing rooted in resilience. But one Rochester woman is on a mission to make it possible. We learn why some say she and the Samaritan Center of Excellence is changing our community one second chance at a time. 

Storytelling is one of those unique tools that has the ability to connect all people. And stories about moms, step-moms, grandmas, and other mother figures can be especially powerful and transformative. Find out what it really means to “Listen to Your Mother.”

It’s not easy for those impacted by substance abuse and the criminal justice system to find a new footing rooted in resilience. But one Rochester woman is on a mission to make it possible. We learn why some say she’s changing our community one second chance at a time.

Also on the show, storytelling is one of those unique tools that has the ability to connect all people. And stories about moms, step-moms, grandmas, and other mother figures can be especially powerful and transformative. Find out what it really means to “Listen to Your Mother.”

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