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David Folkenflik

A bit more than a decade ago, President George W. Bush's press secretary, Scott McClellan, found his credibility in tatters after it became clear he had misled reporters about the leaking of the name of a CIA operative.

Even though he arguably had been set up by less-than-forthright White House aides, McClellan resigned some months later.

Why? Establishing trust between the White House press secretary and the reporters he or she works with every day is critical.

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Let's talk about the new president and the media. President Trump and his advisers certainly are. And NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik is here to talk about it.

Hi, David.

DAVID FOLKENFLIK, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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This past week, a lot of the news was about the news media.

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DONALD TRUMP: BuzzFeed, which is a failing pile of garbage...

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So now we know: This is how it's going to be after Inauguration Day, too.

When coverage falls afoul of Donald Trump, the soon-to-be-president will feed the media itself into the news grinder. As Matthew Continetti wrote in the Washington Free Beacon, the new administration is going on permanent offense; Trump will invert the usual equation to subject individual journalists and their employers to scrutiny and slashing attacks of the kind usually reserved for public officials.

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Diane Rehm is wrapping up a public radio career spanning more than four decades and thousands of episodes. Her talk show has originated at Washington, D.C.'s WAMU and is heard by nearly 3 million people across the country weekly on NPR stations.

Yet The Diane Rehm Show almost didn't get off the ground.

In 1979, Rehm started as a host with a program aimed at homemakers. Several years later, she informed her boss that she had other plans.

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