WXXI AM News

Caitlin Whyte

Weekend Edition Host

Caitlin joins WXXI after working down the street at Stephens Media Group where, she co hosted a children's radio show, "Saturday Morning CarTunes" on WARM 101.3 and worked as a traffic reporter for various affiliates.

Prior to that, she lived in Western Alaska where she worked for KNOM in Nome.  When she was not engrossed in all things Iditarod, Caitlin served as the community and education spot producer and hosted the weekday morning program.

Originally from Rochester, Caitlin graduated from SUNY Plattsburgh with a B.S in Audio/Radio Production and Broadcast Management. She is excited to make the jump to public radio and host Weekend Edition.

 

Ways to Connect

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

With just 10 days left in this year’s budget services, organizations are making their last efforts to get funding for the year. Thursday, local veterans and leaders pushed Albany to reverse cuts to veteran programs.

Veterans and other local leaders stood with Monroe County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo urging Albany to reverse cuts to veteran services in the 2019 state budget.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

Although Governor Andrew Cuomo has recently pulled back on state proposals to cut Medicaid, local unions and hospital workers are still fighting for funding.

Leaders of 1199SEIU and University of Rochester Medical Center employees spoke out against the cuts.

They say these cuts would eliminate millions in Medicaid funding that supports Graduate Medical Education at five academic medical centers across the state, including URMC.

Fred SanFilipo / WXXI News

In just about three months, Gibbs Street will be transformed into "Jazz Street" as the CGI Rochester International Jazz Festival hits downtown.

Now in its 18th year, the festival will be held June 21 to 29 and present more than 320 shows. All club passes will also be shareable.

Producer John Nugent talked about what it takes to schedule a line up for a festival like this.

Siena College

A new Siena College poll covers a range of issues, from what New Yorkers think of the fall of the Amazon deal in Queens, to vaccinations and marijuana legalization.

Steve Greenberg, pollster at Siena, says a majority of voters in the state think it was a bad idea for Amazon to cancel putting a second headquarters in Queens.

"Two thirds, 67 percent say it was bad for the state. It's across the board. 64 percent of city voters, 69 percent of downstate suburban voters," Greenberg said.

Caitlin Whyte / WXXI News

A new collaboration between three local agencies will help find housing for survivors of domestic violence.

The YWCA, Willow Center for Domestic Violence and Legal Aid Society of Rochester have received a grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

That money will fund the Rochester/Monroe County Homeless Continuum of Care (RMHCoC).

Angela Panzarella is the President and CEO of the YWCA and says they want to find people housing that keeps them in their communities.

Highland Park Neighborhood Association

Residents who live near Highland Hospital are worried about how possible expansions to the campus might affect surrounding neighborhoods.

Roxanne Townsend is the chair of the Highland Park Neighborhood Association and has lived in the area for a little over six years now. She said the issue isn’t with the idea of expanding; the neighborhood wants to see the hospital grow.

They just aren’t happy with the idea of the proposed height of the buildings, anywhere from five to seven stories.

RTS

As the ReImagine RTS project moves forward, changing the way buses move through Rochester, different communities are worried how the changes will affect them.

People with disabilities say many are concerned about fixed routes and paratransit.

Fixed routes are the big buses you see out on the roads, following a single route. And under the Americans with Disabilities Act, paratransit has to exist as a supplement to this service. Within three-quarters of a mile around a fixed route, riders with disabilities can access door-to-door transportation.

New York Immigration Coalition

With budget negotiations continuing in Albany, activists from around the state gathered Tuesday  in the capital to demand that legislation be included to expand access to driver’s licenses for undocumented immigrants.

Gabriella Quintanilla with Rural and Migrant Ministry said this access is important not only because of the work she does, but also personally. Her mother is unable to drive due to her status.

Arc of Monroe

Autism testing is now available through the Arc of Monroe.

The testing is required for those seeking eligibility for services through the Office of People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).

Jennifer Parks is a clinical assessment specialist at the Arc and one of two staff members now available for the assessment. She said the testing helps families get started on the right foot as early as possible.

Genesee Community College

Students at Genesee Community College are raising funds to support the college’s first and only LGBTQ+ scholarships.

Kate Trombley is the director of the Adult Education Center as well as the adviser for the Sexuality and Gender Alliance at GCC. She says students in that group saw a need to help LGBTQ+ students in rural areas attend college.

She said one scholarship would be specifically for emergency funding.

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