WXXI AM News

Beth Adams

Morning Edition Host

Beth Adams joined WXXI as host of Morning Edition in 2012 after a more than two decade radio career. She was the longtime host of the WHAM Morning News in Rochester, where she was recognized for her work by the New York State Associated Press Broadcasters Association and the New York State Humane Society. Her career also took her from radio stations in Elmira, New York to Miami, Florida.

Beth is active in the Rochester community, having volunteered for organizations including the Humane Society at Lollypop Farm, the Heart of Gold Children's Foundation, the Rochester Press Radio Club Children’s Charities, and the Rochester Broadway Theater League Education Committee.  She is an avid reader of historical fiction and a devoted animal lover. Beth is married to award-winning writer and author Scott Pitoniak. 

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Brighton police said they launched a criminal investigation after learning about an allegation of misconduct regarding a staff member at McQuaid Jesuit High School.

Chief Mark Henderson said the investigation showed that a female staff member at the school had a consensual relationship with a 17-year-old male student in 2016.

Henderson said based on the student's age and the consensual nature of the relationship, the Monroe County District Attorney's office determined that no criminal charges could be brought.

Beth Adams/WXXI News

Primary elections will be held Tuesday in New York state. 

Voters registered with various political parties in the city of Rochester, Monroe County, and 11 area towns will be casting ballots in a number of races. 

Local primary elections used to be held in September, but election reform legislation that was enacted in New York state this year has moved the date up to June. 

The Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester this week launched the first comprehensive survey of the local Jewish community in a decade.

It's open to those who identify as Jews and have Jewish heritage, but also to people who work for or get services from local Jewish organizations.

The questionnaire seeks information about everything from interests of individuals and families to the need for greater inclusion among groups that may feel excluded. 

The survey also asks how people feel about the rise in anti-Semitism across the country.

freeimages.com/Jason Morrison

Survivors of rape and workplace harassment are cheering New York state's sweeping changes to its sexual harassment laws. The state Legislature's action comes in the #MeToo era in which victims have taken a strong stand against sexual violence.

Among other things, the measures remove a long-standing provision that protected employers from liability if an employee failed to file a complaint or did not follow specific reporting procedures.

Beth Adams/WXXI News

It’s not unusual for the supply of blood donations to run low during the summer months as donors are on vacation and out of their normal routines. The Rochester chapter of the American Red Cross says it received more than double its goal of donors for a blood drive Wednesday in Henrietta.

The turnout might have something to do with the location. The drive was held at Monroe Veterinary Specialists & Emergency Services.

Author Jane Plitt worries that Martha Matilda Harper's remarkable story has been lost to history.

"Her story needs to be held up in the same way that George Eastman is," said Plitt, "as a representative of using business for social change."

Harper, with the help of her intelligence, determination, and floor-length hair, rose from the servant class to worldwide entrepreneur, and her rags-to-riches story started in Rochester.

In 1888, the same year George Eastman unveiled the Kodak camera, Harper, a Canadian immigrant, opened her beauty shop in the Powers Building.

freeimages.com/Alex Ringer

This fall, Lollypop Farm, Humane Society of Greater Rochester will launch an educational intervention program for people convicted of crimes against animals.

The misdemeanors stem from cases of pets not getting proper veterinary care, food, shelter, or water. 

"Maybe it's someone who leaves their pet in a hot car in the summertime," said Kim Ferris-Church, Lollypop Farm's humane education manager.

Provided photos

Eva Mozes was 10 years old in May 1944 when she and her twin sister, Miriam, and their family were taken from their hometown in Romania to the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz.

It was just three weeks before Allied forces would turn the tide of the war in Europe in their favor by storming the beach at Normandy, France, on D-Day, June 6.

Eva didn't know about the invasion at the time. "But I sure wish that D-Day would have happened a month earlier," she said. "Maybe the Nazis wouldn't have been able to take us away."

freeimages.com/Konstantin Schneider

Throughout the State University of New York system, an estimated 35% to 45% of students don't have regular access to food.

As of December 2018, all SUNY universities and colleges have food pantries on campus, but a SUNY food insecurity task force is looking at other ideas to address the problem.

Among them, according to John Graham, association provost for student affairs, is a program called Single Stop.

Two years ago, after a routine blood test, Maryann Fuhrmann's 9-year-old Maltese mix, Bella, was diagnosed with Lyme disease.

"I see tons of ticks on her all the time, but (her) being white," she said, "they're easy to spot, and I am fanatical about checking her over every time I come in the house, so I don't know how it got by, but I really feel like I let her down."

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