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New York's high court upholds requiring insurance to cover medically necessary abortions

FILE - A Police cyclist rides past the New York Court of Appeals, May 5, 2015, in Albany, N.Y. New York's high court has upheld a rule requiring companies with health insurance plans to cover medically necessary abortions. The decision from the Court of Appeals on Tuesday, May 21, 2024, came after a lawsuit from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany and other religious groups that argued the rule violated their religious freedoms. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink, File)
Hans Pennink
/
AP
FILE - A Police cyclist rides past the New York Court of Appeals, May 5, 2015, in Albany, N.Y. New York's high court has upheld a rule requiring companies with health insurance plans to cover medically necessary abortions. The decision from the Court of Appeals on Tuesday, May 21, 2024, came after a lawsuit from the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany and other religious groups that argued the rule violated their religious freedoms. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink, File)

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York can continue to require companies with health insurance plans to cover medically necessary abortions, the state's highest court ruled Tuesday.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany and other religious groups argued that the rule violated their religious freedoms.

State financial regulators approved the policy in 2017. The state Legislature then separately codified the abortion coverage regulation into law in 2022. The religious groups sued over the regulation, not the law.

The Court of Appeals case had larger significance because the state's law could be challenged using a similar legal argument, if the religious groups were successful.

New York Gov. Kathy Hochul, a Democrat, called the ruling a "critical step towards protecting these fundamental freedoms."

In a statement, the Roman Catholic Diocese of Albany said it would appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

"We believe this is unconstitutional since it involves government entanglement in the fundamental rights of free exercise of faith and conscience," the statement read. "The final decision on constitutionality will be by the United States Supreme Court."

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