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'This Is A War Zone': Hurricane Michael Leaves Deadly Trail Through Southeast

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water. Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina. More than a million people are without electricity, and areas along the Gulf Coast and elsewhere...

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A former Perry Town Board member and retired sheriff's sergeant pleaded guilty to murder in the second degree Thursday morning in Wyoming County Court.

Memorial Art Gallery

The Memorial Art Gallery already has three Monet’s, and one of those paintings relates to the series the famed French impressionist did of Waterloo Bridge over a period of years. And now, the MAG has seven more Waterloo Bridge paintings on loan for an exhibition that opened last weekend.

MAG Director Jonathan Binstock says the Waterloo Bridge series really offers museum patrons a firsthand experience of what impressionism is all about.

“What it affords is this opportunity to really get into Monet’s most important contribution, which is his understanding of and ability to render light and atmosphere. Monet was an impressionist; he was interested in the effect of light on the atmosphere," Binstock told WXXI News.

Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET

After the huge sell-off Wednesday, U.S. stocks fell sharply again Thursday. At one point, the Dow was down nearly 700 points. By late afternoon, it had regained some ground but closed down 546 points or a little more than 2 percent.

Over the past two days, the Dow has lost 1,378 points. The S&P 500 was down 2 percent for the day. The Nasdaq lost 1.25 percent.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

It was surreal moment even for a White House accustomed to surreal moments.

During a meeting with President Trump, Kanye West delivered animated and wide-ranging remarks on issues from the 13th Amendment to U.S. manufacturing.

westirondequoit.org

Jeff Crane's tenure as Superintendent of West Irondequoit School District is coming to an end with his retirement in the New Year, but that doesn't mean the district is going to rush to find a replacement.

Board of Education President John Vay says they retained a consultant which met with a number of focus groups and held community forums, while reviewing nearly 400 responses to an online survey.

Vay says going forward at this point, it will be a confidential search process, and the board is prepared to put an interim leader in place, if needed.

The New York State Board of Elections is warning the public to be aware that scammers are contacting people via phone calls and text messages in an attempt to get personal information.

Elections’ officials say that so far, the scam calls and texts have originated from the 607 area code and have been reported in Chemung and Stueben Counties:

The New York State Board of Elections offers the following tips:

• Do not respond to any phone call or text message offering to register you over the phone;

Updated at 4:55 a.m. ET

Tropical Storm Michael rampaged through South Carolina, North Carolina and finally southeastern Virginia on Thursday, before heading for the Atlantic Ocean.

Michael Benson refuses to concede defeat in a series of unsolved, half-century-old crimes – Rochester’s infamous Double Initial Murders.

“A fresh angle came up last week,” Benson says. “Life got exciting for a few days.”

A Soyuz rocket booster failed during the launch of a capsule carrying NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Russian cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin on Thursday, forcing officials to abort their mission. The capsule made a "ballistic landing" and rescue teams recovered the pair, who are reportedly in "good condition," NASA says.

Hague and Ovchinin launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 4:40 a.m. ET, heading to join the crew of the International Space Station. But more than a minute after launch, their Soyuz MS-10's booster failed.

The Landmark Society has announced its 2018 "Five to Revive" -- a list of five historic properties and locations in the region that are in need of investment. We're joined by members of the Landmark Society, who will discuss why these sites were chosen, what they see for their future, and how reviving historic sites can help rejuvenate parts of the community. We'll also get an update on the progress made with last year's selections. In studio:

  • Wayne Goodman, executive director of the Landmark Society
  • Caitlin Meives, preservation planner for the Landmark Society
  • Bob Seem, board member for Friends of Parrott Hall
  • Monica McCullough, Esq., Colgate Divinity School Neighborhood, founder of MM Development Advisors, and co-founder of NYWIRE (New York Women in Real Estate)

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From the Inclusion Desk

Beth Adams/WXXI News

In celebration of National Disability Employment Awareness Month, a local nonprofit is recognizing a long-time employee.

Young Kim is 37 years old. She's been working at Unistel Industries on Blossom Road in Rochester since 2002.

Unistel is a nonprofit that provides job training and placement for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Young and her colleagues work on assembly lines at the company, which is the country's number one supplier of spices for the U.S. military.

Veronica Volk / WXXI News

You may have seen pictures of two local men go viral: a barber giving a man a haircut on the sidewalk because the shop wasn’t accessible by wheelchair.

But since the story went national, it’s raised questions about how people with disabilities are covered in the media.

Devin Hamilton is 30 years old. He's an engineer working in Webster, and he has cerebral palsy. He says one day, he decided to get a haircut at Joe's Upscale Barbershop, a few blocks from where he works. But when he rode his wheelchair over there, he didn't see a ramp.

We're joined by former Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa, who authored the Americans with Disabilities Act. 

Research shows that among similarly sized cities, Rochester is the single worst in the country when it comes to employment and poverty for people with disabilities. 

Harkin is the keynote speaker for the upcoming ROC EmployABILITY conference, which is focused on increasing employment opportunities and reducing poverty among people with disabilities. We preview that conference. In studio:

INTELLIGENT LIVES

In Rochester, the graduation rate for students with disabilities is 22 percent* compared to 40 percent nationally.  The median individual earnings for those with disabilities is $14,450. This is $4,000 below the national median.  That means Rochester’s disabled community is the poorest in the nation when compared to the 75 largest metropolitan areas.

Despite the systemic challenges of educational segregation and stereotypes, adults with intellectual disabilities are challenging the perceptions of intelligence as they navigate high school, college, and the workforce.

More stories from the Inclusion Desk

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