WXXI AM News

social media

Local students are teaming up with nationally-recognized artists to learn how to use art and technology to convey messages about social justice and self-identity. It’s a partnership between the George Eastman Museum and the Out Alliance.

We hear from students in the program about what it means to use social media to express themselves, and how digital tools can make a difference in shaping causes they care about. In studio:

  • Nate Larson, artist with Larson Shindelman
  • Marni Shindelman, artist with Larson Shindelman
  • Reese Simons, recent graduate of Victor Senior High School
  • Hannah Sarnov, rising senior at Hilton High School

Some brands are using CGI in their advertising, and consumers can’t tell that the images are not real humans. Is that ethical? Will CGI define the future of advertising?

We talk to experts about this trend. Our guests:

  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose work focuses on the intersection between social media and the law
  • Anne Esse, creative director and change strategist
  • Dan Mulcahy, creative director for Bush Communications
  • Jennifer Grygiel, assistant professor of communications at Syracuse University's S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

New Buffalo Bills quarterback Josh Allen has had some explaining to do about old tweets that he wrote when he was a teenager. The tweets contained racist, homophobic, and misogynistic content.

This hour, we talk about the consequences of these kinds of posts, how to shape an online identity, and the lessons learned from this incident and others. Our guests:

  • Jeff DiVeronica, sports writer for the Democrat & Chronicle
  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose practice is focused on the intersection of social media and the law
  • Laurie Enright, placement director for AP Professionals

Do you know someone who has left Facebook out of concerns about privacy? Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before Congress over how his company handled user data and privacy, and the company's role in Russia's influence in the presidential election. 

We talk about what we learned from the testimony, the role of social media platforms when it comes to user data, and who owns and is responsible for content posted to social media sites. Our guests:

  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose practice is focused on the intersection of social media and the law
  • Mike Johansson, senior lecturer of communications at RIT, and social media consultant at Fixitology
  • Emily Hessney Lynch, digital marketing manager at NextCorps, and director of content at I Heart ROC

Do you take selfies? Do you own a selfie stick? Do you use the hashtag "#selfie" frequently? If you answered "no" to any of these questions, maybe you agree with critics of selfies, who say they are all about narcissism. But is that unfair?

Researchers at the Rochester Institute of Technology say we are putting selfies in too small of a box. We talk to them about the history and future of selfies, the motivations behind them, and what they tell us about ourselves. In studio:

  • Amanda Kearney, RIT graduate student whose thesis was entitled “Uses and Gratification of Posting Selfies on Social Media”
  • Jonathan Schroeder, professor in the School of Communication at RIT

Buzzfeed's Ben Smith, among other writers, are saying that Big Tech is in trouble. He says Facebook and Google are too big, too powerful, too complacent -- and soon, both consumers and Congress will come for them.

Is he right? Is Facebook primed for a fall? We discuss a future in which Facebook falls, Google shrinks, and everyone posts fewer status updates. Our guests:

  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose work focuses on the intersection between social media and the law
  • Mike Johansson, lecturer at RIT and social media consultant with Fixitology

If you’re like most social media users, you want the freedom to post whatever you’d like and the opportunity to access materials that interest you. Yet, when the technology you use to enjoy those freedoms becomes a way to restrict them, it raises a number of issues. This is the theme behind a number of recent news stories involving social media.

Germany just passed one of the world’s toughest laws cracking down on hate speech on social media. Critics say that the law may lead to censorship because it puts too much pressure on social networks to ban questionable content. In the U.S., the Supreme Court recently overturned a North Carolina law that barred registered sex offenders from using some social media sites, saying it limited their free speech. And at Harvard, a number of students’ acceptances were rescinded after college officials found them posting offensive content on Facebook.

So how can we balance the freedom to post with protecting people from hate speech or offensive content? Our guests weigh in on these stories and more. In studio:

  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose practice is focused on the intersection of social media and the law 
  • Mike Johansson, senior lecturer of communications at RIT, and social media consultant at Fixitology

A year ago at this time, Snapchat was certainly a thing, but not nearly the sensation it has become. These days, younger technology users gravitate to Snapchat, and NPR is using it to connect with a wider audience. What exactly is it? What are the risks? What are the benefits?

Our conversation is all about the year in social media, with Snapchat leading the way. We also discuss Facebook's efforts to handle fake news, and we talk about the biggest legal issues facing social media. Our guests:

  • Mike Johansson, senior lecturer of communications at RIT, and social media consultant at Fixitology
  • Scott Malouf, attorney whose practice is focused on the intersection of social media and the law

Our Monthly Science Roundtable looks at the science of political tweeting. Specifically, Donald Trump said that Hillary Clinton would be a failed candidate if she were a man, and then tweeted that she was using the "woman card." Clinton's twitter account responded with, "If paying for women's health care and paid family leave and equal pay is playing the woman card, then deal me in." Who won that social media exchange?

A team of researchers from the University of Rochester has been digging for the answer, using followers and responses. They believe their work shows who has been winning the so-called "gender wars" on social media. Our guests:

  • Jiebo Luo, associate professor of computer science at the University of Rochester
  • Mike Johansson, senior lecturer of communications at RIT, and social media consultant at Fixitology

Don't feed the trolls? Social media can be ugly. This year, actor Leslie Jones quit Twitter until it went after her tormentors. There have been calls for more stringent policing. And The Atlantic Monthly's new cover story is about what happens when the trolls are ISIS, which uses social media to spread its terrible ideology. 

Our guests come from the upcoming Upstate Social Sessions in Rochester, where handling trolls is just one of many discussions on the agenda. We talk trolls, and preview other themes as well. Our guests:

  • Leah Stacy, conference organizer, and editor-in-chief and co-founder of Boomtown Table
  • Steve Carter, conference organizer and co-founder of Explore Rochester
  • Arien Rozelle, visiting assistant professor at St. John Fisher College
  • Rochelle Bilow, social media manager at Pinckney Hugo in Syracuse

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