WXXI AM News

journalism

The New York Times made serious news last week with the publication of an op-ed by an anonymous writer – a senior official in the White House. Should the Times have published a piece by an anonymous source?

This hour, we’re joined by local journalists who discuss the standards and policies for using anonymous sources. In studio:

Student journalism has come under the spotlight after a series of media outlets reported on alleged censorship of the campus newspaper at Liberty University. Student editors and reporters working for the “Liberty Champion” say faculty members and the president of the university, Jerry Falwell Jr., spiked articles they found to be critical of the university or amended articles they thought were critical of President Trump. Falwell told students that the newspaper had been created to champion the interest of the university, and that the institution, as the publisher of the publication, is responsible for content decisions. The situation sparked debates across the Liberty campus and beyond.

This hour, we talk to local student journalists about ethics issues surrounding student publications and freedom of the press. Our guests:

National news outlets are reporting that Starbucks' pumpkin spice latte is back for the season. It's called trend journalism and its generating free advertising for the corporate giant. Is that fair? Is it journalism?

This hour, we discuss the ethics of trend and calendar journalism and how they impact consumers and small businesses. And yes, we discuss whether pumpkin spice lattes are any good. In studio:

You may have seen the recent TIME Magazine cover that juxtaposed President Donald Trump and the image of a crying child at the American border. It turns out, that child had not been separated from her parents, and now there are questions about whether TIME should have used the image at all.

Our panel of photographers and journalists weighs in. In studio:

  • William Snyder, four-time Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, and chair of the Photojournalism Program at RIT
  • Jenn Poggi, assistant professor of photojournalism at RIT, and former photo editor for the Associated Press and U.S. News & World Report

A new report by the Women's Media Center documents the systemic racism and gender bias in the U.S. News Media. The report, "The Status of Women of Color in the U.S. News Media 2018," shows that women of color are severely underrepresented in all news media.

We discuss the report, and the challenges the female journalists of color face in the industry. Our guests:

CNN reported on voters who unknowingly hosted campaign events sponsored by Russians. One woman in Florida did not believe the FBI's evidence, and told off CNN on camera. That encounter has gone viral, prompting several questions. Among them: did the reporter harass the woman? Could the reporter have approached that encounter differently? How can we break through when so many of us are determined never to change our minds?

Our guests:

When the iconic film Broadcast News was released in 1987, director James L. Brooks gave audiences a well-researched and honest look at how network news was changing. Some say it served as a warning of how an increasing emphasis on attractive anchors and entertainment-driven ideas were growing at the expense of quality journalism. Did the film predict the future of the news industry?

In a recent interview published in The Ringer, Brooks said he doesn't think his film created a lens for the future in the same way as did a film like Network. Instead, he said, with Broadcast News "the future was beginning to happen." Our guests discuss the film 30 years after its release, and if and how it rings true today. In studio:

  • Adam Chodak, anchor and managing editor for WROC-TV
  • Elissa Orlando, senior vice president of television and news for WXXI
  • Rebecca Leclair, owner of Leclair Communications, and former television news anchor and reporter

Is “fake news” our own fault? Mike Johansson says in many ways, it is. He's a lecturer of communication at RIT with experience in a number of newsrooms.

We talk about who's to blame, and what we can do to stop being so susceptible. Our guests:

As more women are speaking out about sexual harassment and sexual assault in the workplace and beyond, women in the media industry — specifically, television news — are sharing their stories of how they’ve been harassed by viewers. It’s a pervasive problem, with women discussing how the men and women who watch them make inappropriate comments about their appearances, clothing, personalities, and more. Anchors and reporters say the comments are offensive, disgusting, and racist.

We’re joined by local reporters who share what they’ve experienced. Our guests:

When reports surfaced that not even BuzzFeed was meeting its earnings targets, young journalists might have wondered: is there a future in this field for me? BuzzFeed has been among the hottest media properties. If the strongest players are struggling, what does that mean for students considering journalism as a career?

We discuss job prospects and the news media landscape. In studio:

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