WXXI AM News

Jeff Spevak

Esther Nisenthal Krinitz, Road to Krasnik, Embroidery and fabric collage, 1994. 28-7/16″w x 32-5/16″h

The blockbuster show at the Memorial Art Gallery now was supposed to be “Monet’s Waterloo Bridge: Vision and Process.” And it is a nice collection of pretty paintings of a bridge. Variations on expressionism. Variations on London fog.

RMSC

The Rochester Museum and Science Center’s “Science on the Edge Lecture Series” has presented talks on the migration of Monarch butterflies and plans for sending humans to Mars in 2020. Later this month, you can hear a lecture on the 3D printing of human organs. But first, this Thursday, the series teams up with the Rochester Music Hall of Fame to ask the question: “Why Rochester? Exploring the Music Business in Our Community.”

Blackfriars Theatre

On the 200th anniversary of the publication of Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein, Rochester’s Blackfriars Theatre presents a show whose title character is based, very, very, very loosely, on Shelley’s notion of a human created out of parts stitched together in a laboratory. The Rocky Horror Show opens Friday and runs through Nov. 11.

And it is no coincidence that right in the midst of the show’s run, we find Halloween.

Michael Benson refuses to concede defeat in a series of unsolved, half-century-old crimes – Rochester’s infamous Double Initial Murders.

“A fresh angle came up last week,” Benson says. “Life got exciting for a few days.”

Jeff Spevak

Here’s what large-scale public events such as the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival tell us: The streets are not simply for cars.

Amanda Searle

The windows of the food trucks were battened down, and potted shrubs rolled across the Speigelgarden as torrents of rain whipped down Gibbs Street Friday at about 6:15 p.m. and through the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival. Day 10 of the 11-day event. The first day of bad weather. The 40-foot wide Immersive Igloo had been deflated as a precautionary measure, the bands were in hiding. But inside Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, Eddie Izzard was coming out to play.

Fred SanFilipo / for WXXI News

It took 4½ decades for Garth Fagan Dance to get around to writing a piece about Frederick Douglass. But the wait is nearly over.

The nationally recognized Rochester contemporary dance ensemble is airing a few sections of the new work on the iconic Rochester abolitionist at this year’s KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival. Along with right-hand man Norwood Pennewell’s new work in progress, “Distant Kin,” it’s clear that Garth Fagan Dance is not leaping on its laurels. 

Jeff Spevak

No historical figure or cultural celebrity is safe from the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival.

Not the living: Cher, Tina Turner, Celine Dion, Liza Minnelli and Leontyne Price. Not the dead:

William Shakespeare, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frederick Douglass, Josephine Baker, Oscar Wilde, Toulouse Lautrec, the drag queen Divine, the theologian and philosopher Teilhard de Charidin.

Jeff Spevak

On a day where millions of Americans were frantically Googling “Mario Kart,” Unleashed! Improv was reminding its audience on Day Seven of the KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival that walking in on your parents while they’re having sex is comedy gold.

Jeff Spevak

These KeyBank Rochester Fringe Festival shows are like chasing lightning bugs across a hillside. For most of the shows, you get one, two, maybe three looks at them. And that’s it. They’re gone.

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