WXXI AM News

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The One Take Film Festival will celebrate its second year at The Little Theatre next month. This year’s films cover a range of subjects, including fracking, race riots, Rochester’s history as a photo city, and more.

We preview the films selected for this year’s festival, and we talk about the art of documentary filmmaking with our guests:

The Black Cinema Series at The Little Theatre continues this month with the documentary, The Rape of Recy Taylor. Oprah recently mentioned Taylor’s name during her acceptance speech at the Golden Globes, saying Taylor never got justice after she was raped by six white men. Taylor’s case – and others like hers – helped spark the civil rights movement.

We discuss Taylor’s legacy, race relations in 2018, and issues surrounding sexual assault. In studio:

  • Kevin Hicks, journalist and vice president for print for the RABJ
  • Allison O'Malley, chief executive officer of RESOLVE
  • Moiet James, development administrative assistant for WXXI, co-coordinator for the Black Cinema Series, and member of the RABJ
  • Ericka Wilson, producer for WHEC-TV, co-coordinator for the Black Cinema Series, and member of the RABJ

The Oscars buzz continues, with this year’s winners changing how we view certain genres of film. Many people say the nods to The Shape of Water and Get Out have helped bring sci-fi and horror, respectively, back to the mainstream.

We talk about this year’s Oscar winners, and how the film landscape is changing. Our guests:

A recent piece in the Washington Post is examining the heroes in romantic comedies in a new light. It argues that now, in the midst of the #MeToo movement, the persistence and grand gestures of men in films like Sixteen Candles and Say Anything are not romantic, but harassment.

Critics say they're just films and we should watch them with that in mind, but others say the media we create can reinforce or warn against certain behaviors in our society. We break it all down with our guests:

  • Monica Hesse, author and staff writer for the Washington Post
  • Esther Winter, local actor, choreographer, and director
  • Patti Lewis, local actor, director, and teaching artist
  • Jack Feerick, critic at large for PopDose.com and former critic for Kirkus Reviews

Black Panther is not just a box office smash; it has already become a cultural touchstone. Our panel will discuss the movie, its themes, and its impact on our society.

  • Melanie Funchess, director of community engagement for the Mental Health Association of Rochester
  • Willis Brooks, PR rep at Entercom, and actor
  • Leslie Youngblood, author of Love Like Sky
  • Mona Isler, executive assistant and staff liaison to the board at WXXI, and comedy improviser

Why are women occasionally abused on movie sets, ostensibly for the sake of genuine art? The question was raised this past weekend, when Uma Thurman told the New York Times about abuses she has suffered. She says director Quentin Tarantino spit in her face and choked her with a chain on the set of Kill Bill.

Maria Schneider famously felt "a little raped" during filming for Last Tango in Paris when she was not warned about a scene in which her character was assaulted. Director Bernardo Bertolucci later said he "wanted her reaction as a girl, not as an actress."

But men rarely suffer such abuses. We discuss the double standard, and we discuss what lines should never be crossed for the sake of art. Our guests:

How much do you know about Star WarsThe Last Jedi comes out this week, and Star Wars fans are already making predictions about the film and the future of the franchise. But what if you’ve never seen Star Wars? Even if you’ve gone your whole life without seeing the films, surely you’ve absorbed some of the saga’s references through your friends and the media, right? Maybe not.

This hour, we talk Star Wars with super fans and with people (like producer Megan Mack) who have no idea who Boba Fett is. We also discuss diversity in casting, the direction of the series, and if the films still resonate today. Our guests:

  • Tiffany Staropoli, Star Wars fan since 1980, and broadcast producer and director
  • Dan HowellStar Wars fan and personal trainer
  • Katie Beczak, recruitment and communications specialist at RIT
  • Juan Vazquez, digital engagement producer for WXXI

A new documentary explores the aftermath of the 2015 mass shooting at the Boys and Girls Club in Rochester. Raekwon Manigault, Jonah Barley and Johnny Johnson Junior were killed during the shooting, which took place during a Stop the Violence basketball tournament. In Move, first-time filmmaker Tam Little speaks with the victims' families and with community members who came together to reduce the violence in their neighborhoods. The film will be screened at The Little Theatre on December 12 and December 15. It's part of the One Take Documentary Series and the Black Cinema Series. The screening on December 15 is sponsored in part by the Association of Black Journalists. 

Little joins us to share what she learned, and we'll hear from the victims' mothers about how they are carrying on their sons' legacies. Our guests:

  • Tameakia Little, filmmaker
  • Anita Barley, mother of Jonah Barley 
  • Lentory Johnson, mother of Johnny Johnson
  • Tammy Burnett, mother of Raekwon Manigault

The movie It broke box office records for late summer, which means two things: Stephen King remains popular, and clowns remain horrifying. Okay, that second part is probably unfair, but Pennywise the Dancing Clown has cast a frightening figure in the film.

So why are we so afraid of clowns? It didn't start with the book version of It, which dropped in the mid-1980s. In facts, it goes way back in literature. But modern-day clowns want to make the case that we don't have to be afraid. We explore the history of our fears and the reality of this offbeat profession. Our guests:

  • Roscoe the Court Jester
  • Richard Hughson, member of Flower City Vaudeville
  • Sky Sands, comedian
  • Abby DeVuyst, librarian, improviser, and actor

The ImageOut Film Festival is back. It showcases films and other creative works that promote LGBT arts and cultural experiences.

We preview this year’s films and talk to the organizers. Our guests:

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